Author Archives: Bri-Tri

About Bri-Tri

Age Group Triathlete, Traveler, Photographer, and IT Professional.

Touring Icelands’ Ring Road

The following post outlines our recent trip to Iceland where we toured this most beautiful country via the Ring Road. The Ring Road, or Route 1, encircles the outer perimeter of entire island. It makes for the perfect guide to view everything this country has to offer. We branched off here and there, but always returned back to the Ring Road. Our trip ended up being about 2000km(1242 miles) total .

We decided to travel “the Ring” in a clockwise direction. The main reason for this was hit the Northern areas first before it got colder since it was late September. You can hit snow at this time of year in those areas and we did see fresh snow on some of the mountain tops in those areas some morning. We also wanted to save the South, which is comprised of the highlights of Iceland for the end. The other way might have been more anti-climatic.

Transportation & Lodging

We chose a small motorhome as our transportation and lodging the trip. Ours was a 3-person which ended up being perfect for us. They do have 2-person ones but they were sold out when we booked our trip. The motorhome is nice because you have a nice bed, bathroom, refrigerator, and cooking. There is also a nice size table and you can relax in there when the weather is bad. There is also ample storage to put stuff so it is pretty easy to unpack your bags a bit.

Heading out for our Iceland Adventure.

We used Motorhome Iceland to rent from which was really just Geysir Rental Car. They were ok, but we had to take the rental car bus from the airport to the Geysir Rental car place and then another guy came in a van and took us to their main office to get the motorhome. Also, the guys that transported us to and from the rental car office, were less than friendly. Especially the guy that took us back there. He just sat in the van and let us take our bags out ourselves.

Our pickup was supposed to be 8 AM, but after all the transporting and going over the vehicle, we didn’t get out of there until at least 10 AM. They also ended up overcharging me $1000 for some reason, but they quickly resolved that once I notified them about.  There are other places to rent, so you may want to check out reviews on some others like McRent and Camper Iceland for example.

You can also rent a “campervan”, which is basically a small utility-type mini-van with some bedding and cooking appliances in them. They are a bit more rustic than the motorhome and from what I saw can get a bit cramped. We saw several people ripping everything out trying to find stuff. Also, they have to cook outside, so when the weather gets really crappy, and it will, they just look miserable. If you are on a budget though they will do the trick.

The motorhome got around 22-23 Miles/Gal when said and done. We drove a total of 2207km, which cost us about $384 USD in fuel. The motorhome runs on diesel to which is a little cheaper in Iceland than regular fuel.


Before I left for Iceland I had my iPhone unlocked by AT&T so that I was able to put a local SIM card in when I got to Iceland. I purchased a Vodaphone Starter Kit at the register of the Duty-Free store in the Arrivals Hall baggage claim area. They are about $15 for unlimited calling/texting and about 300mb of data, although mine said it was a special deal with 1GB of data. You can top off your card along the way too, which I did. I think I paid about $20 for another 5GB of so I would not have to worry about it. I left cellular data on the whole time, tethering to my laptop and my wife’s phone, uploading pictures and still only used ~4GB.

Coverage was mostly 3G/4G, but there were only two times that I got no service and it wasn’t for very long. It isn’t super-fast LTE, but it was more than adequate for using Google Maps and uploading a few pics here-and-there.

I used Google Maps on my phone the whole time for navigating. It worked perfectly. I had taken a bunch of paper maps, but only used them for planning where I was going the next day or so. I also had cached the entire maps of Iceland on my phone before I went, so if I lost cell coverage I could still use Google Maps. I don’t think I had to fall back to that very much.

Dining & Food

Dining out in Iceland is super-expensive. This is where the motorhome/campervan pays for itself. Bonus grocery stores are quite prevalent throughout the country and food is much more reasonable in the grocery stores.

Day 1 – Keflavik/Reykjavik to Bogarnes

We arrived into Keflavik airport pretty much on time. We were a little groggy though due to sitting in an exit row without the ability to recline the seat. We grabbed some breakfast in the airport before heading down to pick up bags. The conveyor belt had stopped and our bags were the last ones just sitting on there.

We headed out to the pick-up area for the yellow rental car shuttle bus. It was pouring rain out and really windy. The bus came pretty quick and shuttled us over to the rental car area. We got off the bus too soon because the Geysir office was around the block, so we had to walk through some parking lots to get there. Next, we had to wait for about a half hour until some guy came with a van to take us to the place to pick up the motorhome.

After filling out paperwork and going over the vehicle, we were finally on our way. The road from the airport area to Reykjavik was very exposed and the wind was whipping against the side of the motorhome. I decided to pull off the road and park in a small picnic area just off the highway and we took a nap. About a 3 hour one!

Finally, the wind calmed down and we headed on our way again. Now, we were hungry though and we could not read any signs. In our search for a restaurant we found a Bonus supermarket, so we stopped there to stock up with some food. It was a bit challenging trying to shop when you cannot read the labels. I tried used my Google translate app in offline mode, but that didn’t work. I had even downloaded the entire Icelandic library. We searched near the Bonus for somewhere to eat, but nothing looked that great.


Alas, a Thai restaurant was found! We had a really good meal at Krua Thai just off the highway. After filling up our bellu, we were on our way to Bogarnes.

We parked down by the Settlement Center and then walked around the town a bit. It was a quaint little town. During our walk around town, we stopped at a cool little café in Bogarnes called Kaffi Kyrrð. Worth a stop.

We had dinner at the Settlement Center and it was really good. Their bread is amazing! They also had a veggie burger too which I was pretty stoked about. It is expensive, but all meals are in Iceland. This one was worth it.

Campground in Bogarnes

We ended up camping at the campground in Bogarnes. There was no attendant or caretaker, just an honor box. It has electric, toilets and  a nice view of the bay.

Day 2 – Bogarnes to Grundarfjörður(Kirkjufellsfoss)

Enjoying our first breakfast in our motorhome

After a good nights sleep and breakfast in the camper, we headed in a Northwesterly direction towards the Snæfellsnes Peninsula. Our first stop was a little brown church that sits among fields of jagged lava rock near the sea called Búðakirkja.

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Budir Kirka, church, Snaefellnes, West Iceland, Iceland

We then headed over to Arnastapi where we cooked up some lunch in the parking lot waiting for a passing rain shower to pass. We then sauntered along the coastline hiking trail to the neighboring town of Hellnar. The rocky, basalt lined coast was quite breathtaking. There were a fair amount of people on the trail, but it was worth the hike.

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Coastline Between Hellnar and Arnastapi

There is a small cafe at the end of the trail in Hellnar that has really good food. My wife loved the veggie quiche. We took a more direct trail back after we filled our bellies with some snack in Hellnar.

Fjöruhúsið café – Hellnar

We then headed around the Snæfellsnes Peninsula, through Hellisandur and eventually getting to the place I had been eagerly awaiting…Kirkjufellfoss. Unfortunately, it poured all afternoon and the tide came in and flooded the easy path up to the waterfall. I tried taking an alternate route through some farmers fields up the road but each time I got drenched when the rain kicked up again. I got in a few shots, but was mostly spending all my time wiping my lens off.

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Europe, Iceland, Travel

We started off camping in a little pull off just down the road outside the nearby town of Grundarfjordur. The wind and rain pounded the camper making it almost impossible to sleep. The wind was hitting the camper sideways and rocking it back-and-forth. I was just waiting for it to flip over. I finally got up and drove into town trying to find a more protected spot.

I ended up parking in the parking lot next to the liquor store and N1 in town with the nose of the camper pointing into the wind. It helped but the wind never ceased until early the next morning.

Day 3 – Grundarfjörður to Siglufjörður

We were awakened quite early the next morning when 2 SUVs packed with Asian tourists pulled in next to us in the parking lot. I didn’t realize it but we were in a car washing area of the N1 gas station parking lot. The one SUV pulled directly behind us within a few inches of our camper. They were all our running around and yelling like it was a fire drill or something.

We hit up the market in the N1 for some more grocery items and fresh coffee before heading back on the road towards the seaside town of Stykkishlomur.

We parked down by the Ferry to Flatey and hiked up onto the hilltop overlook of the ocean.

Lighthouse in Stykkishólmur

We then stopped at Narfeyrarstofa for a really good lunch. Again expensive, but pretty typical for Iceland dining. Must have been a popular place since it was packed by the time we left and I heard waitress say they were booked for dinner that night.

Narfeyrarstofa in Stykkishólmur

After a delicious lunch, we started out on the long drive up to the Trollaskagi Peninsula towards Siglufjörður, or Siglo for short. The drive and scenery were really gorgeous, but there wasn’t a whole lot worth stopping for. We did end up stopping at the northern most tip of the peninsula to catch the sunset while having some dinner.

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Northern Coast of Iceland above Siglufjörður

We then headed into Siglo and setup camp at the campground which is on a patch of grass right in the middle of town. We found a spot to park and setup camp or the camper rather. They had a nice shower in the campground and it felt really good to clean up a bit. It was a Saturday night, so I was in the mood to go out on the town a bit.

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Siglufjörður Campground

The most popular and colorful restaurant in town, Hannes Boy, was a stone’s throw away from our campsite. I could see it was filled with people enjoying their fare on Saturday night. We walked over there and were quickly turned away by the waitress because they were closed for a private birthday party. Really…Closed on a Saturday night??

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Hannes Boy and Kaffi Raudka

Next door to Hannes Boy is the equally colorful Kaffi Raudka. This place has the shortest hours I have seen. Daily from 12pm to 5PM. So naturally they were closed.

We walked around town a bit and never really found anything worthwhile. We spotted the very new looking Siglo Hotel across the docks and headed over there. This place was very nice and open to the public. You could tell this had some American influence to it. I enjoyed a couple Icelandic IPA’s in a nice little lounge area that looked out on the water. Turns out the own had lived in the States for some time and came back to open this hotel. It was a very nice place.

We were abruptly woken by a group of young drunken revelers yelling at the top of their lungs walking down the sidewalk directly behind our camper. One of the disadvantages of camping in the middle of a town. There is another campground just up the hill outside of town too, which was totally empty when we were there. Not as convenient and no bathroom and showers, but probably a little less noisy too.

Day 4 – Siglufjörður to Ólafsfjörður

We managed to get back to sleep and woke at fairly decent hour. We walked through town and found our way to the Aðalbakarí Bakery, which was surprisingly open. I enjoyed some good coffee and some really good fresh baked pastries with some locals and a few other tourists too. Note: public places do not open very early in Iceland. Even places that claim to serve breakfast. It is a bit annoying at first, but if you plan accordingly you get used to it. It is helpful to have a camper with cooking utilities.

We putzed around the camper and caught up on some social media stuff in the later morning. We drove around a bit and found a small ski area up the mountain on the southern part of the town. It was a cool vantage point to see the whole area. The other campground was not too far away and we parked there while we hiked up the mountain side towards the avalanche fencing  on the top of the mountain which is named Hafnarhyrna. It was quite a breathtaking view of the whole fjord.

Pano View of Siglufjörður

We originally planned to stay in Siglo for 2 nights, but at the last minute we decided to head over to the next town of Ólafsfjörður instead. The Siglo campground has good facilities for dumping gray and toilet water as well as filling up with water, so we emptied out the camper before we headed down the road to Ólafsfjörður

The route to Ólafsfjörður is through a long single lane tunnel through the mountain. It was pretty crazy and when cars came through the other way they would sit in little pull-offs that they had every situated through the tunnel Ólafsfjörður felt practically deserted. The campground was totally empty except for us. We walked around the town a bit which seemed almost deserted. It was a Sunday night though, but nothing was open so we just ate in the camper. Another younger couple pulled in the campground and pitched their tent not too far away. It was getting pretty cold that night and I felt kind of bad for them out there while we were nice and toasty in the camper.

Little Church in Ólafsfjörður

The campground attendant stopped by to collect the tariff for the night. He was really friendly guy and we shot the breeze for awhile asking him about life in Iceland.

Day 5 – Ólafsfjörður to Reykjahlíð(Lake Mývatn)

We headed out of Ólafsfjörður pretty early making our way down to Akureyri, the largest city in the north of Iceland. It was rainy pretty hard that morning and the drive was pretty dismal.

We parked in the public parking area in downtown Akureyri. It is sectioned off my the amount of time you are parking there. There was no indication of how you were supposed to designate you paid or not so I was a little nervous when we headed to the little downtown street. I stopped in a tourist information center and asked and the girl said just leave a note on your dash telling what time you parked. Pretty loosey-goosey here. And why don’t they tell you that somewhere when you park? I headed back to the camper and put the note on the dash.

We did a little window shopping in town and stopped in a cafe for a cup of coffee while we waited for the rain to clear a bit. Before we knew it it was time for some lunch.

We made several back-and-forth trips on Hafnarstræti Street between Kaffi Ilmur and Símstöðin Restaurant trying to decide where to eat. We eventually settled on Kaffi Ilmur which was a little more homey. They had a fish buffet(~$20) upstairs, which Denise took advantage of, and I settled on the Falafel Fritters with gluten-free bread(2480 ISK, which is about $22). Everything was very good but typical expensive Icelandic prices.

We got back on the road after lunch making our way North, then West to Goðafoss (waterfall  of the gods). This was the first big Icelandic waterfall we had seen so far and it was pretty impressive. I was now in Photographer mode.

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Goðafoss Waterfall

It was a little tough shooting this falls since it was the middle of the day and the sun was immediately behind it. Not the optimal time to shoot a waterfall. It also had a lot of spray and the wind was blowing it right at us. There was also a bunch of people there too which makes things challenging too. I didn’t come away with any real barn-burner pics from this one.

We headed towards Lake Mývatn next. This was the less expensive, northern cousin to the Blue Lagoon in Reykjavik. I was looking forward to a good soak at their nature baths there. It was really cold and windy when we got there, so Denise was a bit apprehensive at the thought of going swimming. When I told that it was ~$35(USD) each to go she was even less motivated. I eventually convinced her to go though.

It was well worth it! While it was freezing cold going from the showers to the nature bath, once you got in it was awesome. The pools were set on the top of a rise and had a horizon pool-style edge. The sunset was beautiful and everyone was taking pictures. I on the other hand, forgot to bring my GoPro and took none. What was I thinking?

We headed back to the Bjarg Campground perched on the east shore of Lake Myvatn in the town of Reykjahlíð. This was there last night open before closing for the season, so we unknowingly timed that perfect. Unfortunately, we had to walk to the bathroom and showers at the main building since the one close to our campsite was closed up. The bathrooms were also co-ed which was a bit odd. I wonder how people from North Carolina would deal with that? LOL!

I had been monitoring the Aurora Borealis(Northern Lights) activity since we had gotten to Iceland using a couple iOS apps on my phone. There had been some sightings of it before we had gotten over there, which was a bit odd for mid-September. This night was showing some good probability for seeing them and the sky was the clearest it had been thus far. I set my alarm for 1:30AM so I could take a look outside.

My watched buzzed at 1:30AM and I took a look out the back window of the camper. I saw looked to be clouds and they appeared to be moving a little more than typical clouds. I kept staring at them, wondering if I was just still in my sleep-fog or if they were really moving. Finally one triggered me to get out of bed and get dressed.

I walked outside and stared at the sky. I was now pretty sure this was the Aurora. I reached in the camper and grabbed my tripod with camera attached. I set the ISO to around 4000, opened up my aperture as far as I could, and set my shutter speed to about 8 secs. I aimed the camera at the sky and hit the cable release. As the image displayed on the back LCD I saw the bright green of the aurora displayed in all its glory. BINGO!!

My photographic adrenaline exploded. I was now wide awake! I ran back to the camper to wake Denise up.

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Aurora Borealis above Lake Myvatn

The one thing I had forgotten to do was set the focus on my camera, so the first shot was quite blurry. It is pretty hard to get focus on a camera when it is dark out. I found a nearby light that I was able to key on and get some focus set. I then proceeded running around the campground shooting images of the sky like a kid having a shopping spree in a candy store.

It was really cool that when we saw these lights that we were in a lakeside campground with tents pitched all over the place. Made for some cool foreground elements. I also got a shot of Denise staring at the sky while they lights bounced across the sky.

The moon was pretty bright out this particular night so it kind of diminished the actual color of the Northern Lights when looking at it with the naked eye. Denise was a little disappointed by this. A friend from work who had been there previously had told me this, so I had a little bit different expectations.

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Aurora Borealis above Lake Myvatn

The lights danced until about 2:30-3AM before they fizzled out.  I headed back to the camper to go back to sleep thinking about all the aurora pics I get to process the next morning. Really cool.

Day 6 – Reykjahlíð to Egilsstaðir

We headed just up the road to Mt. Namafjall/Hverarönd geothermal area after breakfast. It was kind of touristy place with a large parking lot and lots of cars and buses. Right next to the parking lot was a bunch of hot pots of bubbling grey goo and steam vents shooting geothermal mist into the air. The good thing was the people didn’t venture too far from the parking lot, so we took a little hike up the barren side of Mt. Namafjall and were quickly away from them. The view up top was pretty amazing. You could see the whole Lake Myvatn area on one side and then the barren geothermal plains on the other. it was a nice little hike, but it did get a bit steep as you approached the summit.

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Hotpots at Hverir Geothermal Area

The only thing bad about this area was that it stinks like rotten eggs! I cannot stand eggs or the smell of them and it was a bit unnerving. Denise loved it. You do get used to it though.

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Hverir Geothermal Area

Next stop was Dettifoss waterfall. This was located on an out-and-back Route 862 off the main Ring Road. It seemed to take longer to get there than I anticipated. We had some lunch in the parking lot before taking the hike down to the falls. It is a big powerful falls and quite impressive. I again hit this falls in the middle of day. but atleast the sun was behind me this time. I was able to get some good shots with rainbows across the falls which was pretty cool. Selfoss falls is also a short walk up river from Dettifoss, but I didn’t find that one all too photogenic. This was definitely a worthwhile stop.

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Dettifoss Falls
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Dettifoss Falls

Next, we headed to the town of Egilsstaðir for our final stop of the day. Egilsstaðir is a larger town and bit more commercial. There is a decent campground there on a side street in town and plenty grocery stores and places to eat.  There is also a bar right at the campground, but I didn’t check it out so not sure how it is. We ate at Salt Cafe & Bistro, which was quite good. There pizza and desserts are excellent!

Day 7 -Egilsstaðir to Seydisfjordur to Egilsstaðir

We made our way over the pass to the fjord town of Seydisfjordur after eating some breakfast. It was a pretty cool drive making our way up and over the fairly steep mountain. It was a very rainy day, so visibility was not so great.

I stopped along the way down into Seydisfjordur to take some pictures. It was quite scenic and there were some nice waterfalls along the way. Of course, when isn’t there waterfalls in Iceland?

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Falls along road coming into Seydisfjordur

We cruised around the small town that flanks the banks of the fjord in a U-shape. There was a very large ferry ship docked in the apex of the fjord, but didn’t seem to be much action there. They say that the town can get VERY busy when the ferry arrives or departs from/for the continent. I believe this is usually on Wednesdays but you should probably research that.

There are a lot of hikes in this area and we settled on one with an obvious trailhead marker and parking lot off the road on the sourthern side of the fjord. It was right across the street from the Brimberg Fish Factory. The followed a dirt road before eventually heading off onto a much smaller rocky trail. The rain picked up the farther and higher went.

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Tvísöngur – Seydisfjordur, Iceland

We eventually came upon these five interconnected domes called the Tvisongur Sound Structure. Each dome has a different tone in it and we took turns testing that out. It was also a welcome refuge from the rain. We headed farther up the mountain on the trail and hit some steeper rocky sections. While normally I wouldn’t think twice about these, the downpouring rain made them a little tricky. We walked on some more which basically was a bit flatter pastures.

Pano view of Seydisfjordur, Iceland

We decided to call it and turn around. The visibility was not great and the rain just kept pounding. So we headed back to the camper. We stopped at the Skaftfell Bistro but it didn’t open until 3pm. The guy inside said Hotel Aldan had a nice lunch buffet.


We drove back to the infamous “Blue Church” and parked the camper taking the rainbow colored road through the quaint little town. Not much was open, but the Hotel Aldan and the Kaffi Lara/El Grillo Brewpub. We checked them both out and settled on the buffet at Hotel Aldan. It was a wise choice. We had to share a table with two guys but not a big deal. Buffet was great and there was a ton of vegetarian options for me too. Iceland is far more veg-friendly than I thought it would be! We also saw the guy from Skaftfell Bistro come and start working here. I guess thats why he doesn’t open until 3PM! Life in a small town.

We headed over to Kaffi Lara so I could sample a couple of their craft brews after lunch. They were ok, but I ended up have one of my favorite IPA’s Úlfur Nr.3 Borg Brugghús . The rain continued on harder and harder. Seemed like a good day for drinking beer! Others had the same idea because the place filled up pretty quickly.

We then drove back over to Skaftfell Bistro and parked in their parking lot until they opened at 3 PM. Denise took a good nap and I headed into the bistro. I was the first person in there and found a nice booth by the window with a power cord. I set up my laptop and got to work downloading and editing all the pictures I took so far. It was a much-needed break.

The bistro was playing some music that I had never hear before but was really diggin’. Not sure if it was just the music itself or the fact that the bistro kept playing the album over-and-over again, but it seemed very familiar. I Shazaam’d it and it was a guy named Rodriguez, Sixto Rodriguez actually. His music seemed kind of 70’s -ish and rightly so it was. Kinda reminded me of Bob Dylan but much better. Turns out it is a pretty interesting story there.

The Bistro was also filling up and Denise awoke from her nap to join me. Several people ordered pizzas and they looked really good. I decided to indulge in one myself. I had had a couple beers too so I needed to soak those up a bit too.

We later decided to head back over the pass and stay in Egilsstaðir campground for another night. There wasn’t much going on in Seydisfjordur, so no sense in making the next day’s drive longer.

Day 8 – Egilsstaðir to Höfn

The next morning we ate, showered and headed to the N1 station to refuel. I also had to get a new tank of propane since ours was getting close to empty. I wasn’t sure if there would be any places to get more on the way to our next destination, Höfn. It was also about halfway so I figured that it was a good point to exchange it.

The drive got a bit windy early on and I had to make a couple stops since the camper was feeling like it was going to be blown over. Eventually, the road turned to stone as we headed up and over a pass. As we crested the pass we were presented with the most spectacular view. It felt like we were driving down into a crater. The waterfalls coming over the edges were actually blowing back up from the wind whipping up the valley. The land below was a patchwork of greens, yellows, and orange colors. It was simply breathtaking.

As we lowered down into the valley we were flanked by pastures of beautiful Iceland Horses and the farms they belong to. The high mountain walls behind them made for a spectacular backdrop.

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Iceland Horses in the East Fjords of Iceland

Eventually, we reached the coast again and encountered some different, but still beautiful, seaside views. We reached the town of Höfn as it was just turning dusk. There was a field full of Icelandic horses on the road into town and we had to stop off and take some shots of them. They had a bit of a moat around the fence line of the field, so you couldn’t get too close to them.

We drove around the town and checked things out. It had a small part with restaurants and supermarket, but most of the town was warehouses and industry buildings. We stopped at the Nettó supermarket and stocked up on some groceries. I got another bag of those little cinnamon rolls too…Yum! The beer store in the market was already closed up, they have VERY limited hours everywhere, so I had to settle for a couple 2%-ers in the market.

Next, we traveled down the block to Kaffi Hornið for dinner. There wasn’t a whole lot of options and this place looked decent. There also wasn’t much in the way of vegetarian either except one main dish that was way too expensive. This place is ALL about the Langoustine…aka Lobster. I ended up settling on the Langoustine Pizza which would fill me up without too much damage to the budget. They also had a good craft beer selection too. This place was crazy expensive even for Iceland. I think they knew you didn’t have too many other options so they nail you good. We also ran into the couple we met back in Egilsstaðir here and caught up with them a bit.

We decided to do the camp at the Campground in Höfn for the night. We had to pay, but it is so much easier than trying to find somewhere to pull off for the night. Plus, we get a shower and regular bathroom.

Day 9 – Höfn to Jökulsárlón Iceberg Lagoon

Sunrise in Höfn Campground

Next, we headed to Jökulsárlón Iceberg Lagoon. On our way, we saw the large glacier spilling down into the flats. You could see along the road how the glacier once met the ocean, but now it had retreated pretty far back to the mountains above. Sad.

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Happy to be in Jökulsárlón

We got to the lagoon pretty early, before the masses came. It was a photographers paradise. We walked around a bit but then headed West a bit to escape the crowds. We took a decent walk that flanked the West shore of the lagoon heading north towards the glacier. There were only a few other people here since most of the typical tourists don’t leave the visitor center parking lot.

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Jökulsárlón bay and the Breiðamerkurjökull Glacier

We were able to get some really good views of the icebergs, glacier and even a sea lion hanging out on a floating chunk of ice.

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Sea Lion hangin’ out in Jökulsárlón Iceberg Bay

We had reservations in the afternoon to do a Glacier Kayak Adventure with Arctic Adventures, so we headed over to their meeting place at Skalafell Guest House after having some lunch. Once there they suited us up in dry suits and headed over the terrain in a tundra buggy. We stopped at a parking area overlooking the Heinabergslón glacier lagoon. Below was a fleet of kayaks waiting for us.

The trip was pretty cool. We paddled all around this massive chunks of ice that calved off the Vatnajökull glacier. We docked the boats a large chunk about the size of a football field that had a massive ice cave going through it. Our guide handed out MicroSpikes for us and we all went and explored the cave. We paddled around for another hour and a half and then headed back. My toes were pretty numb at this point so I was ready. It was kind of an expensive excursion but I think it was well worth it.

After the kayaking, we headed back to Jökulsárlón again. This time we went across the street to the Black Sand Beach where the Icebergs empty out into the sea and then get discarded on the beach. It is really cool since the ice becomes almost crystal clear and the contrast with the black sand makes for some amazing pictures. I could have spent a week here. I was on the beach until the last shred of light before heading back to the motorhome and having some dinner.

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Black Sand Beach at Jökulsárlón

The rain and wind picked up while we were eating dinner, so we headed back across the street and set up camp in a lower parking lot of the visitor center. There was another large camper there and we were a little more protected from the wind. Another rainy, windy night!

Day 10 – Jökulsárlón Iceberg Lagoon to Skógafoss

The next morning I was up early to get some pictures of the glaciers in the lagoon before we headed on. It was a very dreamy like morning and made for some really cool shots. The light was so surreal. Such a cool place!

Europe, Iceland, Travel
Morning in Jökulsárlón Glacier Bay
Europe, Iceland, Travel
Misty Morning in Jökulsárlón

Next stop was the Skaftafell Visitor Center at Vatnajökulsþjóðgarður National Park. The main feature here was the Svartifoss Waterfall. It was a nice little hike up to the falls and there were several other falls along the way. The Autumn colors were really brilliant too and made for some stunning views.

There is also a nice campground here too which was fairly empty. We did take advantage of it to empty out all our tanks and fill up with some fresh water.

Europe, Iceland, Travel
Canyon at Fjaðrárgljúfur

Next, we stopped at Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon. The canyon is a short drive off the Ring Road, but the road is a bit rough. Especially for a motorhome. The canyon is really cool and we could have spent a bit more time exploring it than we did. I think at this point we were getting a little tired and kind of kept this short. I think the quantity of other tourists in this region, compared to the North and East, was a bit overwhelming for us.

We got to Vik as was getting dark and found the Halldorskaffi restaurant for some dinner. They had some good pizza and beer selection.

The wind and rain had picked up a bit while we were eating dinner. We stopped at an N1 and retooled a bit with some snacks, before heading Westward to camp for the night. We stopped at a small pull-off which was right next to the road and started to setup for the night. The truck traffic was a bit loud and there was not much cover from the wind here, so we decided to push on to Skógafoss falls. This would be a good move.

Skógafoss had a campground right next to the falls, so it would be perfect for getting some early morning shots. The wind and rain had also ceased and the Northern Light decided to light up the skies for a second time now.

I was out by the stream taking pictures and a girl from another camper came over and said “Do you think we have any chance of seeing the Northern Lights?” I said “Yes…there are right there.” and proceeded to show her the back LCD of my camera. She ran away yelling to her friends.

Day 11 – Skógafoss to Reykjavik

The next morning I was looking forward to some early morning shots of the Skogafoss waterfall. Denise was not in the camper when I woke up, so I figured she was in the bathroom. I took some shots of the falls from behind the motorhome. So glad I did this because pretty soon after the falls became loaded with tourists. I went back to the motorhome and Denise was still not back yet. I waited and waited, still nothing. Now the throng of cars were pulling in and filling up the previously empty camping lot. A large van full of Japanese models and photographers pulled up right next to our van and were making all kinds of commotion. I was starting to lose my cool now.

Denise eventually texted me and here she had hiked up the waterfall and back to the falls laying behind it. I waited for her to come back and then I left and did the same thing. Skogafoss is cool, but the falls behind it were amazing. I could have spent the entire day there. Unfortunately, it started pouring rain but I did get a few good shots.

Next stop was at the Seljavallalaug pool. It was a dirt road back into a little village nestled between some mountains. The road got a little rough before hitting the parking lot. Then a short little hike up to the pool. The pool was not super hot, but it was relaxing nonetheless. It got a bit crowded after I got in.

Enjoying a “soak” in Seljavallalaug pool
Europe, Iceland, Travel

After my refreshing dip in Seljavallalaug, our net stop was the Seljalandsfoss waterfall. The parking lot was packed with tourists. At this point, I was having my fill of tourist crowds. We had some lunch in the motorhome first and then headed up to the waterfall. It was a procession of tourists up, around and under the falls. Between the people and the heavy mist from the falls, I had a hard time getting some decent pictures here. It just didn’t have the same mystique that all those images I had seen of before had. We didn’t hang around here too long.


We continued on our way back to Reykjavik. I had planned to stop at Selfoss falls, but could not find it. I had kind of had enough at this point and was looking forward to getting to Reykjavik now. I didn’t really expend too much energy trying to find Selfoss either. I never thought I would ever get tired of photographing waterfalls, but I think I was pretty close at this point.

We finished up our Ring Road tour and set up our last camp at the Reykjavik Campsite which is right in the city. The campsite is really nice for being right in the middle of the city. Very spacious and nice facilities too. We took a nice walk into the downtown area for some dinner.

Walk into downtown Reykjavik

We made our way up and down Laugavegur Street and finally settled on a place called Harry’s. While it may sound pretty generic, it was a really nice place. I had a really good Vegetable Curry. They also had pretty assorted menu that would cover all tastes.

We did some more walking around town after dinner and made a stop in the Irish Pub for one last Iceland Pale Ale before we left. They even had my favorite, Úlfur Nr.3, on tap. While walking around we noticed something strange above us in the sky. Looking up we were presented again with another showing of the Northern Lights. Third time! Unfortunately, I only had my iPhone and no tripod to brace it. It was the perfect end to an amazing trip!

Northern Lights in Downtown Reykjavik


We returned our motorhome early the next morning. The guy from Geysir that met us there and took us to the airport was less than friendly. He literally dumped us of at the Geysir Car Rental Office. We rented a car for the day and drove around the city for the day. We had originally planned to go to the Blue Lagoon for the day, but realized that you needed to make a reservation beforehand.

This trip was one of my favorites. Despite not being quite as active as some of our past trips, the scenery and photography surely made up for it. Having the motorhome made it easy to be close to the good spots and get there before the masses of tourists invaded them. Typically, when we are on trekking trips you are kind of slave to a schedule so you don’t always get to the great photographic spots at the right times. The motorhome also made the high expense of eating out in Iceland a non-issue. My wife was on a specific diet, so she was able to stay on it since she could make her own meals. I will definitely consider doing the motorhome trip again.


My 2016 Year in Review – Topping My Charts

I have just returned from another fabulous Winter weekend in the Adirondacks to celebrate the New Year. While I was there I had gotten in some ample cross-training time skate-skiing, hiking and some photography. This outdoor time gave me a good amount of time to reflect upon the last year. I keep hearing others saying over-and-over how 2016 was such a horrible year, but for me, not so much.

Cascade Moutain – Lake Placid, Adirondacks, New York

You would think that as one gets closer to the big 5-0 that PR’s and things would become less frequent. But my 48th year was full of them. What is up with that? Perhaps the fact that I had well preserved myself well during my 20’s and 30’s may have something to do with that.

December(2015) was full of Winter cross-training in Banff National Park in Western Canada. They had gotten a good amount of early season snow there and Lake Placid had none. We hit the downhill slopes at Lake Louise and Sunshine Village, got some snowshoeing in on the Bow River and a ton of photographing the beautiful Winter scenery on the Icefields Parkway leading to Jasper.

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First Light on the Icefields Parkway

In January, we had plans to spend a week in the warmth of Sedona, AZ but that was cut short due to a blizzard that delayed flights for several days. We still ended up with an amazing, activity packed long weekend there. We got out for some amazing hikes and photography some beautiful scenery. I replenished my vitamin D store with the clear skies and bright sunshine. It was a great reset before turning my attention back to the long Ironman training season that lies ahead.

Chillin’ on the Bell Rock Vortex

In February I started up my official Ironman training season with Todd Wiley. I had gotten to know Todd over the last year or so through some of his workshops and Lake Placid training camp and really like his personality. He was a prior pro triathlete and has had a lot of success with some pretty high-level athletes over the years, so I thought I would see what he could do with this old, average dude. My goals for the season was to increase my IM run performance while maintaining my bike and swim and finalizing that with a sub-12 hour Ironman.

In March, I had my first official race of the season, The St. Pat’s Allentown 5k. While it is only a 5k, this would be the first test of my fitness to see what I had accomplished during the last two months. I would also use this as my Lactate Threshold(LT) test for my training. It did not disappoint. I finished with a 1 sec PR of 22:45(chip time) over my prior PR from 2013. 3 years older and getting faster.

St. Pat's West End 5k 2016
St. Pat’s West End 5k 2016

In April, I took things up a notch and competed in the local St. Luke’s Half Marathon which I hadn’t run in since 2013 when I ran with my wife. I was planning to run it in 2015, but got a stomach bug the morning of and had to bail. My current PR for this race, and half marathons in general, was from back in 2010 when I finished with a 1:46:41(chip time). I also had challenged my co-worker Steve, who is what I would consider more of a “runner”, to a duel for this race. It was a bit of a stretch, but I thought the extra competition would bring out a little extra in motivation for me. Although I didn’t come close to beating him, I did manage to eke out another PR for myself finishing in 1:45:10 after 6 years. 2 races and two PRs…not too shabby a start to 2016.

Next up was my first triathlon of the season, the French Creek Olympic Triathlon. I had never done this race before, so I didn’t have anything to compare it to. I knew it was a pretty brutal race with a very hilly bike and run, so you could not even compare it to any other Olympic Distance race. I obviously did not PR this race, but I did end up on the podium by taking 3rd in my age group. This was the first podium since my very first multisport race, the Belleplain Duathlon, back in 2008 where I finished 1st in my age group. So now 3 races and 3 top outcomes.

French Creek Tri Podium
French Creek Tri Podium

In June I traveled up to Syracuse, NY for the Ironman 70.3 Syracuse triathlon. Another race I had never done before, but was hoping for a good finish here given the prior results so far this season. The race started off well with one of my best half-iron swims and a decent bike leg where I felt I hadn’t “burned too many matches.” The run leg was a different story. The sun came out and the heat turned up towards the end of the bike and my body turned to mush. Reminiscent of the Ironman Couer d’Alene run I fell into a walk-run for the very hilly run course. Ok, you can’t have them all! So with no PR to be had this time, I took my setbacks here and turned it into motivation for the true goal “A” race of the season at Ironman Mont-Tremblant.

Finish Run Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016
Hurtin’ for Certain – Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016 – High Temps on the run left a little to be desired for this race.

July turned out to be a pretty hot month, so I gained some pretty good acclimatization to the heat while training. If Ironman Mont-Tremblant (IMMT) was going to cook me like Syracuse, I was now prepared. Well, as much as someone who does not like the heat can be.

August came around quickly and tapering was in full swing as we made our way up to Mont-Tremblant for the peak race of my year. When race day came I could not have asked for better weather conditions. It was very cloudy in the morning as I prepared to hit the water. A fighter jet buzzed us so close it brought tears to my eyes. Then the cannon blasted and we were off. The rain started during the swim and poured down all day! For me, that was perfect conditions. I was like a pig in the slop.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 Bike Rain
Terrential Downpours on the bike leg of Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016

Due to some choppy lake conditions, my swim was not as fast as I thought it would be, but still one of my faster IM swims. My bike was one of my fastest so far but yet I still held back as I planned to save something for the run. The run was my best ever Ironman run. The rain came down and kept me cool while cranking out some 8:30-9:00 pace miles. I felt amazing the whole time. I blew away my sub-12 hour goal by about 14 minutes and coming away with an Ironman PR of around 50 minutes! I chopped off almost 30 minutes on my IM run time alone. Mission accomplished!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Finish

So now 5 races completed for this year and 3 of them were PR’s and 1 podium. What more could I ask for? A fabulous end to an epic season for sure. Proof that aging does not mean you get slower. At least not yet. Maybe by the time I am 50 I can qualify for Kona? 🙂

Usually with the last race of the season comes a little depression that it is all over for another year. I like to schedule something big for after my last race that keeps me on the up-and-up. Just when you think things can’t get any better we headed to Iceland for a two-week journey around the island in a camper.

Kirkjufellfoss – Iceland 2016

I let my body recuperate a bit and broke out my camera for an incredible trip. It was the perfect diversion for someone who has only thought about training for the last year. The scenery was out-of-this-world and it was a great end to all the hard work that was put in over the last 8 months. I have been working on a full report blog post on this trip which I hope to be published very soon. Stay tuned for that.

While you would think that was all for this year, I had to do one more race. I signed up for the local South Mountain 10-miler run which was kind of a birthday run for me. I had never done this race before, but it looked to be quite challenging. It starts not too far from the Lehigh Univesity’s Goodwin Campus fields and a makes it was up to the very top of South Mountain, turns around and heads back down again. It is very steep and a big slog. I ended up 40th overall and 6th in my age group. Not a great result really, but I maintained a 8:12 pace which is just a bit off my half marathon pace. It was more for fun so I am not too worried about that.

I concentrated on my photography a bit for the remainder of the year, which tends to play 2nd fiddle to my training. I made a couple trips to Lake Placid and a short trip to Salt Springs State Park(PA) for some photography sessions. I came away with some keepers and also started getting more active with my Instagram feed. I dug back into my photo archives and found some great pictures I had taken in the past that never made it off my laptop.

So now as we head off into 2017 and I set my sights on Ironman Boulder and the inaugural Ironman 70.3 Lake Placid this year, I have great memories looking back on the amazing year that was 2016. Despite what many others have felt. I have so much to be thankful for. I can only hope that 2017 is even half as good as last year.

I can only hope that 2017 is even half as good as last year. Although, it is already shaping up to be a pretty full one. I have several races on the docket and plans are already being hashed out for an amazing trip to Croatia and Slovenia during post-race season. As for goals, Ironman Boulder should be a challenge in itself given the altitude so I am not putting any time goals on myself for that. Perhaps working on pacing myself would be enough. I think Ironman 70.3 Lake Placid may be my A race for the year and I would like to shoot for a half-iron distance PR there.

My other goal for 2017 is to get back to regular blogging here. I have fell off the wagon a bit over the past year so I hope to pick that up again. I have just “cut the cord” and cancelled my cable TV subscription, so besides saving money I plan on spending a little less time in front of the tube.

If you are reading this, I hope you had a great 2016 and a even better 2017 as well. Thanks for reading!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Feeling pretty relaxed after finishing and just coming back from my post-race massage.

Trying Out Hello Fresh Meal Subscription – $40 Off Coupon Code

I decided to give one of those meal subscription plans a try as we start off the new year. With the uptick in training time, I find I have less and less time to cook a good healthy meals and frequently fall into the trap of leaning towards convenience and quickness rather than healthiness. I am hoping this will help thwart that. We’ll see.
I selected Hello Fresh since they offer a vegetarian option and had good reviews as well. Stay tuned for subsequent review of the plan in the upcoming months.

$40 Off Coupon Code

If you are interested in trying this out too, here is a $40 off coupon code on your first order.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 Race Report-Perfect Execution

The alarm on my Garmin buzzed at 4:15am. I popped out of bed after a so-so night of sleep. Probably one of the better nights’ sleep before an Ironman event. I felt pretty rested and amazingly relaxed given I was about to be racing for ~12 hours. Hopefully less though. I was about to embark on my second attempt of my goal of finishing an Ironman in under 12 hours. Since my fastest time so far was 12:37 at Lake Placid in 2013, I had my work cut out for me.

Last year, I had made my first attempt at breaking the 12-hour mark at Ironman Coeur d’Alene in Idaho. Unfortunately, Mother Nature had something else in mind and provided 107 degree(F) temperatures that forced me to bail out with 13 miles left on the run. The dreaded DNF(Did Not Finish). This year, I was more determined to hit the goal I had hoped for last season.

I made and downed my usual morning smoothie along with a couple cups of Kicking Horse 454 Horse Power coffee, packed my special needs bags and headed out to the race venue. Denise drove me the 3 miles down to the swim start area and then I walked around a mile or so to the transition area. I dropped off my bags, loaded my water bottles and Amrita Bars on my bike and walked back to the swim start. I found a nice quiet place under a pine tree to just sit and chill until Denise and her parents came down.

I had turned off my Garmin 920xt watch in order to save the battery bit, but when I turned it on it just sat there with the “Garmin” splash screen. Hmmm…ok this is not good. I started pressing combinations of buttons to try to reset it. Finally one worked. Not really sure which one though. I restarted it and it finally started correctly. Whew! Not having a watch for a 12 hour race would not be good.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant Race plan forecast IMMT 2016
This was the race plan I had given to Denise the day before doing Ironman Mont-Tremblant. I always give her this before races so she can figure when to be where while watching the race. You may want to refer to this after finishing this post.

It was getting close to race start and I hadn’t seen Denise yet. I started to roam around a bit but still didn’t see her. They started playing the Canadian National Anthem, so I stopped and listened to that. No sooner did the anthem end and this fighter jet came soaring up the lake directly over our heads!! BOOM!!! WOW! It practically brought tears to my eyes! Not sure why that does that?! If that doesn’t fire you up for a race, I don’t know what would. Now I am fired up!

Right after the jet buzzed me, I spotted Denise in her “Kale” T-shirt. She was looking a bit panicked and emotional but was so relieved to find me. We were both amazed at the jet and could not stop talking about it. A few minutes later the jet buzzed by us again and fireworks at the swim start went off. What a start to the day! Next, the canon went off as the pro men started to hit the water.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Me acting like a goofball prior to the race start. Feeling pretty loose that day.
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Me acting like a goofball prior to the race start. Feeling pretty loose that day.

After the pros started it was a constant stream of age-group wave starts. We headed down to the very crowded beach and spotted my in-laws. We chatted a bit and then I realized I should get going. Good thing because I realized my wave was up next and I had to walk a little distance around to get in the start chute. I had to navigate through about 3-4 waves to get to me wave, which started right after I got there. And away we went…

The Swim

The swim started pretty comfortably. It was a beach start and I slowly made my way in on the outside edge of the group. I settled into a nice easy stroke. Everything was going great until about halfway out the first 1.2 miles(swim is one, 2.4 mile loop). I took a mouthful of water while taking a breath and started to choke on it. I do this on almost every swim, so I don’t panic about it. I just have to let my throat clear a bit to start swimming again.

The  swim was pretty calm until about 2 pylons from the turnaround. The wind was at our backs and it was hitting the water at this point, so it was getting a bit choppy. As we made first turn it got REALLY choppy. I felt like I was in a washing machine! I had to breath to my left only cause I would get clobbered with waves breathing right. I just kept my stroke and pushed on. It felt so clumsy with the waves bouncing me up-and-down. Eventually I reached the second turn bouy and made the final turn back to the swim finish.  The waves continued for 4-5 pylons(13 per 1.2 miles). Eventually, things calmed down a bit and the waves flattened out a little bit.

I was feeling pretty confident in my swim since I was passing many different color swim caps from wave groups ahead of me. I also was not seeing many silver caps from my wave so I had hoped I left many of them behind me. The first time I looked at my time was not until after the 2nd turn and it read around 38 minutes. Pretty much on par for my swim. I was hoping for 1:13-1:14-ish.

I thought I was getting really close to the swim finish, but then realized the course turned in to the right a bit. So I had to start heading in and it seemed to add some time until the finish. It got very shallow too and I had to stand up a bit and then was able to swim a little more when it got deeper again. Finally I hit the finish and ran up to the wetsuit strippers. I had trouble finding a stripper that was free so I probably lost some time there. Done…Time: 1:15:50…meh.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Swim exit. Only swim picture I got.
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Swim exit. Only swim picture I got.


I ran through the narrow, carpeted chute heading to T1 scanning all the screaming spectators trying to find my wife. I finally found her on the opposite side and cut across to give her smooch. I am sure I probably cut someone off for that, but it is worth it. 🙂 Transition was busy but I found an empty chair and put on my bike gear. I then headed to the bike racks and grabbed my bike and was off. Time: 7:40

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Racked an Ready
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Racked an Ready


I headed out on the bike course and heard Denise yelling from behind the fence. I gave her a good “parade” wave on my way Montee Ryan. Montee Ryan had a few little climbs but nothing major. We then made a sharp right turn up onto Highway 117 which comprised the next 30 miles. As you entered the highway there was a long moderate climb, but most of the highway was fairly flat cruising road.  There was one pretty decent climb on the way back. The good thing was you got to go down it on the way out. I hit over 50 MPH going down it during the first loop, which was before the rain really started. Weee!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Heading out on the bike before the rain had started.
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Heading out on the bike before the rain had started.

Sometime after the big downhill and the turnaround on Hwy 117 the rain started. And it really started dumping too. There was also a pretty stiff headwind once you made the turn on Hwy 117 to head South. The raindrops actually hurt when they hit my arms. They were pounding on my helmet too making a very loud noise, constantly. It was like people were flicking the fingers against your helmet the whole time. The lenses on my glasses were just covered with water drops. Could have used some wipers or Rainx.

The rain continued to pour harder and harder as the bike went on. My Stages Power meter, which I had just replaced with a new rubber gasket, wrapped in plastic and black electrical tape began to fail. This device always fails on me whenever I wash my bike, so I thought that the extra wrapping would get me through a rainy race. Not the case. While it was still sending watts to my Garmin, the wattage numbers were getting lower and lower, which basically made it unusable.

I was now flying by feel. The good thing is that because I monitor my wattage frequently in training, I know what certain wattages feel like in my legs and in relation to my perceived exertion(RPE).

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Bike - Weathering the storm!
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Bike – Weathering the storm!

We then made a short loop through the downtown area of St. Jovite before heading back to the turnaround in Mont-Tremblant. My parents had decided at the last minute to come see the race and had found a B&B South of St. Jovite and I knew they would be spectating in the area. I scanned all the people on the street but didn’t see them as I made the turnaround on the main street. Then I heard my Mom yelling from behind me and turned around to see her standing back at the start of the turnaround. I gave her a wave and then got back into cruising mode again.

As we approached the transition area we then headed to the 20km out-and-back section on Chemin Duplessis. The 10k out to the turnaround is the toughest section on the bike I think. It is a bunch of little steep climbs that seem to step-ladder its way to the turnaround. It gains about 550 feet over 6 miles. The good thing is coming back is like a roller-coaster ride. I was not able to take as full advantage as I would have liked to due to the slippery conditions, but I did hit 40 MPH on it.

I finished the first 56 miles in under 3 hours which was a little over 19 MPH average. A little higher than what I was planning, but I knew I would drop a little bit on the 2nd loop. So far still on track. My legs were feeling a little crampy, but not too bad.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Bike thumbs up!!
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Bike thumbs up!!

I stopped at the Special Needs area and refueled with more Amrita Bars, 2-bottles with Skratch Labs hydration and one small bottle with my special race fuel mix.

My special race fuel is 4 scoops of Hammer Perpetuem Orange, a packet of beet powder(equal to 6 beets) and two dissolved Salt Stick capsules. I had one of these bottles on the first 56 miles, which I tend to occasionally sip between feedings of Amrita Bars. I had done this consistently in training and it worked so well.

I typically pack a peanut butter & jelly sandwich in my special needs bag, but this time I packed a peanut butter sandwich with 2 Maple Honey Stinger waffles instead of bread. Yummy! I chomped this down on the first climb on Highway 117 via the on ramp. A lady rode past me as I was devouring my little sandwich and said “lunch time!” I laughed and continued munching it down. You know it!!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Bike - Torrential Rains pounded almost the entire bike ride.
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Bike – Torrential Rains pounded almost the entire bike ride.

The rain got harder and the other rider seemed to be more spread out on the second 56 mile loop . I just settled into a nice consistent cadence and enjoyed being in my little helmet bubble. The puddles of water seemed to be more plentiful on the second loop too, so I made a little game of trying to avoid them.  The time felt like it went so much faster on the second time around. I was surely not looking forward to my second run on Chemin Duplessis though. I know it would hurt.

I took the long, fast downhill cruise on Hwy 177 a little slower the second time around due to the torrential conditions. Still managed to hit about 40 MPH. I was not looking forward to the turnaround since I knew the blustering headwinds were just waiting for me. They didn’t let me down.

I eventually hit the turnaround in St. Jovite. Gave Mom a couple waves and then back to the task at hand. I cruised back into Mont-Tremblant and prepared myself for another bout with the dreaded 10k of Chemin Duplessis.

There were tons of fans lining the road and cheering as you start out on Chemin Duplessis which is a huge help on that first climb. I was surprised to find that my legs actually felt better the second time around than the did on the first. I kept a nice easy spinning gear and made my way up and up and up. A great sigh of relief came as I reached the turnaround and knew it was pretty much all downhill know to the end of the bike leg.

Now I wondered how my legs would be on the run. When I did Syracuse 70.3 earlier in the Summer, I thought my legs were good to go for the run when I came into T2 but I quickly found out that was not the case. It is always a mystery and you don’t know until you get there. For now I could feel the anxiety of it.

I dismounted my bike and headed into T2 at 6:05:38. I averaged ~18.4 MPH over the 112 mile course which included about 5700+ feet of elevation gain. This was mostly right on par with the predicted time that Best Bike Split had calculated. This was somewhat surprising since I really had no power meter numbers to go by since my Stages power meter had failed miserably on me. Again!


I gave my bike to a volunteer and awkardly shuffled my way in my bike shoes to the transition tent. I grabbed my run bag and quickly found an empty seat. I changed into a nice dry pair of running socks…ahhh! And put on my running shoes. It felt SOOO GOOD to have dry socks on my feet! I put on my run hat and run belt and headed for the run. There was no need for sunglasses or sunscreen since it was still raining. Now the moment of truth. Come on legs…don’t fail me know. Time: 4:30

The Run

Whenever you start out running after being on a bike for 6 hours, your legs are going to be a little wonky. The first mile of the run also had a nice little hill in it, but I easily cruised up and over it. As the road flattened out a bit I was started to get an idea that had some running legs under me. Nice!

My plan was to take all on course nutrition this race. In my previous Ironman races, I had carried my own bars and a FuelBelt with my own hydration. A bunch of extra weight. This year I decided to lighten my load a bit and just take it from the aid stations. I always carried bars, but ended up not wanting to eat them or having trouble getting them down while running. This year I trained with gels on my runs and it was an easy way to get the calories in that I needed and then wash them down with water. I figured if I ate the solid food, like Amrita Bars, on the bike I would have a good base in my stomach and the sugary gels wouldn’t be so rough on my stomach.

I downed a gel at the first aid station and followed it up with some water. Unfortunately they only had berry flavor and not my favorite Mocha with caffeine. Oh well. It went down fine and I was feeling pretty good.

There was some slight hills in the first couple miles, but my legs managed to feel good despite them. I lowered the pace a little just to keep them happy.

As I approached the crest of the last big hill for a while, I saw my wife and in-laws standing just down the road where the condo we stayed was. I raised my arms high in the air, Rocky-style as I came over the hill to let them know I was feeling good. They got a kick out that. They shouted some words of encouragement as I cruised by and I told them I was feeling awesome!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Denise and her parents planning out their course of action for raceday. Spectating looks like a lot of work? I'll just stick to racing thanks!
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Denise and her parents planning out their course of action for raceday. Spectating looks like a lot of work? I’ll just stick to racing thanks!

The next mile or so was mostly downhill through the old village before flattening out onto a recreational bike path for the next several miles. I was really feeling amazing. I felt like I was running on my favorite running path, The Ironton Rail Trail(IRT), on a training run. I was looking down at my Garmin and seeing paces in the 8:20-8:40/mi range. I was in the zone, feeling good with a nice steady cadence. The rain started again and I was loving it! I was thinking if this keeps up I could destroy my goal here.

I heard a voice on my left and it was one of the bikers that lead the pros on the run. I stepped to the right a bit and she was riding along side me for a longer than usual time. She even complimented me on my pace which was pretty cool. Eventually she moved past and Laurel Wassner came up next to me. Usually, the pros just whizz past me as I am slowly trying to maintain some semblance of a running trot. Not today. She actually took a little bit of time to actually get past me. You really get to appreciate the speed of the pros when you are arm-to-arm with them. I gave her some words of encouragement and then she was off down the path.

After the out-and-back on the path we did a shorter out-and-back on a packed sand path before heading back up the hill and through the pedestrian village. This was at around the 10 mile point and when my legs started to feel a little stiff. I am sure the uphill had something to do with it.

The 3 mile stretch from the top of the hill back to the ski village was probably the roughest part of the run for me. Strangely it was mostly downhill though. My stomach was feeling a little queasy, but I knew I needed to keep some gels going in for energy. I think this was more of a mental thing since I knew I was not quite halfway and I needed to do this again. That all changed after I made my way up the steep hill into the upper side of the ski village.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - running through the village with a bunch of Clifblocks stored in my cheeks. #LikeAChipmunk
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – running through the village with a bunch of Clifblocks stored in my cheeks. #LikeAChipmunk

As you come into the side of the ski village, spectators line the narrow chute through the cobbled street cheering like crazy. Little kids hands leaning out from both sides looking for high fives as you wind your way down through the quaint little village. I sure hope they washed those hands after! My mental state was instantly renewed.

I headed back out for the last 13 miles. I fast-walked up the steep little hill by the swim start and then settled into a nice cadence after that. My legs went on auto-pilot from there on out. While despite the stiffness, they just kept running. It almost felt like I couldn’t stop them if I wanted to.

I passed Denise and my in-laws as they were walking in towards the finish line. They shouted some words of encouragement and I yelled back that “I need more rain!” I guess they were confident I was going to finish at that point.

I hadn’t really looked at my overall time on my Garmin since I was just really enjoying the day. I didn’t want to ruin it by seeing that I may not make my goal time and honestly I almost forgot about that. I was REALLY just enjoying being able to swim, bike and run for an entire day!!! And on a cooler, rainy day too! That may sound strange to some, but I LOVE IT!!!

Before I knew it I was heading down the hill through the old village and onto the bike path. I also got that rain that asked for too! Thanks to the Dude upstairs! I settled back into my nice cruise mode cadence on the flat bike path through the woods for the next 5 miles.

I downed a few gels along the way and water at pretty much every aid station. Somewhere around halfway through the run, they broke out the soda at the aid stations. Well, typically it is Coke, but for some reason they had Pepsi. Yuk!! I am not a soda person, but there are two times I like to have a Coke: On an airplane and at the end of a race. Don’t ask me on the first one, but the second one provides a good blast of caffeine and sugar into my bloodstream to get me to the finish line. Personally, I think this is the ONLY justifiable reason for having the stuff.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - On the run. Must be getting tired here...starting to hunch a bit.
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – On the run. Must be getting tired here…starting to hunch a bit.

So now I could really use a blast of Coke and my only option is Pepsi. I skipped the first few aid stations that had it, but eventually succumbed to the powerful nectar. And I almost puked immediately! Pepsi is the worst! I eventually got it down and then from there on, I mixed it with water to dilute the nastiness of it. Finally I had some caffeine and sugar coarsing through my veins to get my to the finish in a brisk fashion.

They also brought out the Mocha ClifGels with Caffeine too, which is my favorite. I did most of my run training with this flavor and assumed they would have this on course. Maybe they don’t break out the caffeinated stuff until later? Between this and the Pepsi I was back in action again.

I finally reached the uphill section starting at the old village and knew I was only 3 miles away from finishing. I looked at my Garmin… 11:12:?? Wow…I think I got this?!!! With a renewed enthusiasm I now cruised up the remaining hills knowing that I needed to keep a running pace to keep that goal. It seemed to get easier knowing the finish was in reach and I was going hit under 12 hours.

About 2 miles from the finish, the sky parted and the Sun came out to brighten up the last few miles of the most spectacular day. You could not have scripted this any better.

Next, my Garmin beeped and displayed the message “Battery Low”. A little panic raced across my mind. Please don’t die on me now Garmin! Then I realized that it really didn’t matter at this point, but it would be nice to have the whole race recorded. I guess the failure of my Stages Power Meter kind of invalidated it anyway. Argh!

I grunted out that steep little hill right after the swim start. I remember a little girl cheering me on “Come’on Brian…you got this!”, everyone yells your name since it is clearly displayed on your bib. There is no way I could walk now.

Finally, I reached the final uphill before we turn right into the narrow village street lined with screaming spectators. The reality of reaching my goal time had started to sink in. A ton of different emotions swirled through my head. The past 7 months of training flashed through my mind. The past 8 years of training flashed through my head. From struggling to run a mile and struggling to swim 25 yards to now putting together a solid Ironman in under 12 hours. WTH???!! I really did all that? I thought about all those people that helped me get there and supported me on this amazing journey.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Heading towards the finish line!
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Heading towards the finish line!

I headed into the cobbled village street past the final aid station. I declined the cups of water and Pepsi this time and instead just thanked the awesome volnuteers, who endured the torrential rains all day. I slapped as many of the little hands from the kids that were sticking out along the way down the narrow-fenced chute of the cobbled street. I then reached the familiar fork in the road. To the right was to start the 2nd loop. To the left was the finish line. I very happily veered to the left and cruised down to the finish line. I heard Mike O’Reilly start to say my name…”Brian…” Silence…Pause….”Schwind!” Then right on to some other guys name. For the 3rd time now, he has still yet to say “You are an Ironman!” after saying my name. WTH Mike??!

I happily crossed the finish line, raised my hat in the air and hit the stop button on my Garmin! 11:46:37!!! YES!!! Well officially it was 11:46:47.

If you look up at the predicted finish time I gave my wife, you will note that it reads 11:46:09. Only 47 seconds off! LOL!


Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Finished 11:46:47!!!
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Finished 11:46:47!!!

The Finish

I was quickly grabbed by both arms two really nice ladies. They got me a water, a COKE and a freakin’ HUGE finishers medal that almost pulled me to the ground. They escorted me to a guy that took my chip off my leg and another that gave me a finishers hat and tech t-shirt. They opened my can of Coke up for me too after I struggled with it for about 10 seconds. They asked if I wanted a massage? “A Massage??” I said “Hell Yes!” I was then instantly whisked away, out of the finisher area and up a hill into a round building. There were massage tables lined up everywhere and athletes getting massages. What I picture heaven to like.

The ladies led me over to Karen and said goodbye. I thanked them and then was instructed to lay down. Karen asked me what hurt and told her “quads and calves!”. She then worked her magic. I was so relaxed but was a bit worried because I never got to see Denise and my family at the finish. I had looked around, but never saw them. I was hoping they were not worried.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 - Feeling pretty relaxed after finishing and just coming back from my post-race massage.
Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Feeling pretty relaxed after finishing and just coming back from my post-race massage.

After my awesome massage I went down to the athlete dining area and headed towards an area where spectators where standing. Denise and her parents were there and she loooked very relieved to see me. We chatted a bit and then I headed back to the feeding area to get some post-race Poutine!! Yum!

Denise and I then took the pedestrian lift up to the top of the village and headed to La Grille for my post-Ironman tradition of a Pizza and Beer. Another Ironman finish was officially complete. This one was even a little bit sweeter than the others.

Thanks for reading!







Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016 Race Report

Ironman 70.3 Syracuse was my “B” race for the year. This season has started off quite well for me so far, and I was looking forward to keeping that momentum going with a good performance here. I knew the course would be challenging, but I was hoping to get something around 5:30-6 hours.

Heading into the weekend the weather was looking pretty good. Sunny, mid-80’s and minimal winds. Mid-80’s is a little high for me but hopefully, I would be finishing by the time it got that high. My plan was to have a good swim, take it easy on the bike(~0.75-0.78 intensity factor), and then finish with a solid run in the 1:50-2 hour range.

Travel & Lodging

We headed up on Friday and spent the day in SkaneatlesNY. We were hoping to get out on the lake for some SUP time, but the wind was a little too brisk. I didn’t want to be out there paddling my ass off two days before my race. So we walked around town and did some window-shopping instead.

The crystal-clear water of Skaneatles Lake

We stayed at the Holiday Inn Express in Dewitt for the weekend. It was fairly nice hotel. It had been there for some time but was clean and well kept. The location was good for the race and was also easy drive to locations downtown

Core Life Eatery Bowl

for dinner. It also close to the Erie Canalway path which is great for a short bike ride or run.

The Hotel also had a pretty good looking breakfast, but we opted for something a little better at the Rise n’ Shine Diner  in North Syracuse.  Really good breakfast! For a healthy lunch I would also recommend the Core Life Eatery in North Syracuse too. We have one of these opening near us and I am so stoked. I will be hitting that on a regular basis for lunch!

Erie Canalway Path

For a really good dinner, head downtown to the Armory Square area to the Aster Pantry & Parlor.  Really good food, amazing service and cool atmosphere. So good we ate dinner here twice.

On Saturday, we headed over to the race venue to check-in and drop off my bike in transition. Temps were already heading past the forecasted temps I had seen earlier in the week, so I was already starting to suspect this was not going to be an easy race.

Jamesville Lake Beach

Water temps were in the low 70’s according to the guy doing the Athlete Briefing meeting, which I overheard as I checked in. Pretty sure it would a wetsuit swim, but I was going to switch to my “john” wetsuit instead of full-sleeve. With the heat I generate, staying cool is priority one for me.


I suspected a long line of traffic getting into the parking field at Jamesville Beach on race morning since it is only one road that all funnels into one entrance to a big field. We left the hotel at 5am for the 15-20 minute drive to the race, and it turned out to be not that bad. We only got backed up about 1/10th of a mile out from the entrance. The worst part was the traffic directors randomly decided to send us to the farthest point away from the race venue after parking everyone in front of us to the closest point.

I made my way over to transition to set up my small plot of real estate. I bumped into Megan, who had also did Ironman Coeur d’Alene last year and we both share the same coach. I was situated pretty close to the bike out, so it was pretty easy location to spot. Just to be sure, I hung my lucky Notre Dame golf towel next to my bike on the rack.

I then decided to walk all the way back to the car and drop my transition bag off at the car. I don’t know why I did this. It is a pretty long walk and I probably would have been better off just relaxing.

My wife and I made our way to the swim start and I got into the water to do a little swim warm-up. Little is not an understatement here. They had the swim warm-up contained within the tiny, roped-off beach section of water. It was packed with a bunch of wetsuit-clad triathletes trying to swim circles in this ridiculously small area. It was almost comical.

My wave was one of the last waves to start, so I had plenty of time to stand around waiting. Eventually, the yellow caps started congregating and I moved into the mix as they slowly made their way to the swim start arch.


I positioned on the far outter right-side of the group to give myself some clear water to swim. Or so I thought. I immediately became draped in seaweed. I felt like the creature from the black lagoon! I started trying to make my way back into the pack to my right, but the seaweed continued. Eventually, it did get better and the pack started to space out a bit. I kept sighting the pylons but they seemed like they were moving away from me.

I settled into a nice stroke rhythm and before i knew I was making the first right turn. As I made my way back I was right on the inside track going right next to the pylons. I felt like I was cruising now and even passing a bunch of people. Some from my wave and some from earlier waves too. I had a feeling it was going to be a decent swim, but I didn’t dare take the few extra seconds to look at my watch.

Eventually, I was nearing the shoreline as started to see the sand on the bottom. I swam past a few guys who stood up early. I always make sure I don’t stand up until my hand touches bottom. And then touchdown! I got up pulled my goggles onto my forehead and looked at my watch…34:5?? something….Sweet! By the time I hit the timing mat and pushed my lap button it was around 36 minutes and some change. Pretty happy about that.

Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-20160622014.jpg
Swim exit – That’s me just heading out of the frame


The race had wetsuit strippers and I was debating whether to use them or not. I decided at the last minute to use them which, unbeknownst to me, threw off my wife from videotaping me. She was apparently standing near the first couple strippers, and I hit the last ones due to my indecisiveness. They struggled a bit getting my wetsuit over my feet, so I had to pull my legs towards me to help them.

I then made a steady jog through the long aisle to my bike, spotting my old lucky Notre Dame(Go Irish!) towel. Shoes, socks, helmet, sunglasses and unrack bike. I was off…


The bike exit was all grass for about 10-20 yards and what seemed like a long little uphill jog until you reach the pavement where the mounting area was. I mounted my bike and headed out onto the road. I quickly came up to my on the side of the road wife taking pictures with her iPhone and gave her a wave as I cruised past.

Out on the Bike…

The first 12 miles of the course is, well, uphill. There is short steep downhill at around 4.25 miles, which is followed by a sharp 90-degree right turn and then right back to climbing again. My plan was to put it in an easy gear and spin easy for the first 12 miles. I felt I did that pretty well too. There were guys flying past me, out of the saddle, and I just laughed to myself how that was going to hurt later. I checked my Garmin after the hills subsided a bit and I was at around 0.82-0.85 Intensity Factor(IF). My goal for the bike was to be in the 0.75-0.79 range, but the hill climbing would surely skew that higher.

Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-Bike Elevation Profile
Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-Bike Elevation Profile

The course then turned to long sweeping downhills and flatter sections. I switched into a bigger gear and settled into a nice cruising cadence. Speeds then ranged from 18-22+ MPH for the next 30 miles. There was an occasional hill here and there, but nothing like in the first 12 miles. There was one steep downhill where I reach over 48 MPH which was scary fast. The excitement was quickly squelched when the uphill that followed was just as steep.

Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-20160622013.jpg

Around mile 45 we hit some more longer, less steep climbs before the final steep descent into the transition. I really felt good heading into T2 and I felt like I succeeded in my plan to take it easier than usual on the bike. Looking at my IF on my Garmin showed around 0.75, which is right at the lower end of my plan.

The one factor I did not take into consideration at the end of the bike was that the temperature was starting to hit the high-80’s. It is not always very obvious when you have a 20 MPH wind in your face.


I cruised into T2, dismounted and headed to my transition spot. I was feeling really good and remember thinking to myself how I thought I was ready for a good run. I put my running shoes, hat, sunglasses and bib on. Sprayed my shoulders with some sunscreen and headed out on the run.


The first quarter mile or so was paved, a little uphill and headed past the finish line area. We then passed through a treeline  and out into the large field were the car park area was. We ran around the perimeter downhill and then it made two rights up a rather steep hill until we got to the road. This is where things started to take a turn for the worst for me. The heat eliminating from this field felt like it stole my oxygen or maybe just my “mojo.”(Not too groovy, Baby!)

The uphill part of the field, right before you got on the road, really sucked too. My legs started to feel like they were going to cramp which sent a wave of panic through my head. I decided to walk up the hill.


Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-20160622011.jpg
Not enjoying life right here

I eventually reached the road which was fairly downhill for a stretch. There was no shade though and the heat was baking the asphalt. I told myself to just keep a steady pace until my legs came around. I settled back into an 8:30-9:00min/mi pace. Not really were I wanted to be for a half-ironman, but looking at it retrospect I would have done well if I could have maintained that.

I hit the second aid station and loaded up with some water and ice. Things were starting to feel a little better now. Until…

Mile 2.5…My run took a turn for the worst. It was almost a mile of steep uphill. Not fun. Lots of walking. Just the view of this steep hill that doesn’t seem to end really played with my head.

Part way up the hill I heard a female voice from behind me say “I love Amrita Bars!” It kind of startled me at first and took me off-guard. She then said that she had 3 of them on the bike too. I was in such a world of hurt at this point I could barely get the words “Cool!” out of my mouth.

Once I reached the turnaround at the top of the hill I got back into a jog again downhill. I then decided to walk the aid stations in order to get liquids in. I also started drinking Coke. I usually save this for the end, so this was not good. But it did help.

My mind was dreading the thought of having to do this all over again. The temperature was getting hotter too. Probably reaching around 90 by now.

I came back into the turnaround, which the make you run right past the finish line. Thanks Mr. Race Director! I came upon my wife standing in one of the few shady spots near the finish line. I had my head down and told her I was not doing good. I was also about 20 minutes past the time I told her I would be back. She told me to “breathe” as I headed past her on my way for another 6 and whatever miles.

Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-20160622009.jpg
Relieved to have the finish line in my grasp. The red glow is not from me overheating but actually the flow of the finish line decorations…I think?

I continued to walk the hills and aid stations. It was mostly damage control at this point. I remember somewhere feeling a bit dizzy from the heat. I was on my threshold of heat tolerance, but managed to push through it. I was dumping ice everywhere in my race kit and hat. Chugging coke along the way. I could not get enough liquids.

I started to get into a slow but steady shuffle for the last couple miles. I think the magnetic force of the finish line was pulling me to it.

I finally reached the finish line, relieved, and gave a half-assed arm wave as I made my way through the archway. A bit disappointed, but happy to be done.

I found my wife and met her at the fence while I collected myself a bit.

Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-20160622008.jpg


This race felt like a smaller version of last years’ Ironman Coeur d’Alene, except I actually finished this one. I executed my swim and bike exactly according to plan. Unfortunately, the heat had gotten the best of me again on the run. I just don’t do well in the heat, no two ways about it. I also wasn’t really acclimatized to it yet since this was an early race.

One other thing I realized after was that I don’t feed well on the run. I always bring my beloved Amrita Bars, but I just have no desire to eat them or anything solid for that matter while I run. This happened during my half-marathon earlier this year too. I have always been anti-gel, but I think I may need to consider this for the run. I need something that is a quick shot of energy that will go down easier. Especially when it is hot.

9af819b3304ae9e78c4b7cf3c3fe977bb9a9f9f917b58d8a78bcfb56d6069e98-20160619007.jpgIronman 70.3 Syracuse 2016-20160622015.jpg

I am going to revisit this aspect of my run nutrition for the next couple months before Ironman Mont-Tremblant. I need to get more energy during the run and this is critical when I have to do a full marathon. Stay tuned on that.

This race has was a bit of a blow to my confidence. But, I need to leverage this setback to help push me harder for my A race. I have to acclimate better to the heat and improve my nutrition on the run. I think the swim and bike improvements are also a good step in the right direction.

Thanks for reading!


Race Report:French Creek Olympic Triathlon 2016

The French Creek Triathlon was my first triathlon event of the year. I didn’t know a whole lot about the race, but the timing of it fit well into my schedule. After checking out the race course and past results on their website, I knew I was up for a challenging event. Most of the prior years’ Olympic distance finish times in my age group were hovering around the 3-hour mark. A bit long for typical Olympic distance events. Usually, I am around the 2:30 time frame for Olympic distance tris. Having mountain biked at French Creek in the past, I knew it was hilly and the bike and run course solidified this.

I drove an hour up to French Creek State Park on Saturday, via the beautiful back roads of the Oley Valley, to pick up my race packet and do a little bike/run brick workout to preview the course a bit. The bike route was definitely hilly and most of the roads were in nice shape except for a partial stretch of Rt 345 that is in dire need of repaving.

I had to delay my course recon ride a bit while the French Creek”Tough Kids” triathlon was finishing up. It was pretty cool seeing all these little kids out there giving it their all. While I was waiting a minivan pulled up and the guy driving rolled the window down and introduced himself. It was Todd Hydock, another Amrita Ambassador that lives in the Philadelphia area. I had known of Todd but had never met him in person. We chatted for a while until the kids race had finished. Todd was doing the sprint race on Sunday, so we would talk more on Sunday.

Race swag was pretty nice for a small event. They had a nice white race tech shirt and a Clean Bottle water bottle. I had always wanted to get a Clean Bottle but never got around to getting one. There was also a reusable cloth tote bag and some other items from Brandywine Valley tourism too.

It was pretty dark for the ride up and it was just barely cracking light when I arrived at the race venue. It had rained heavily overnight and was still overcast which kept things dark until I got to transition.

I found an empty space on the rack right at the swim-in/run-out end of transition. Everyone else seemed to be congregating towards the other end. I preferred having space. It was still quite damp out, so I was happy to suit up early with my wetsuit.

I gingerly made my down to the swim start in bare feet to get in a little warm-up swim before the race. I was the first one in the water. Water wasn’t too bad. A little cool but perfect for a wetsuit swim. The water was a light, muddy color but not so dark you couldn’t see at all.

I had a lot of time before my wave start since it was the 2nd to last wave. My toes were pretty much numb by the time the race started. I really need to remember to bring some old flips or socks or something. I chatted a bit with a lady named, Jennifer from NJ, who was also outfitted in full Amrita Kit. She was not an Ambassador but knew Arshad and was a loyal Amrita customer.

I also ran into Amy & Bill Kline who are good friends with my old tri-blogger-buddy Shanna. I have run into them a lot over the last couple years and they are really nice to talk too. I didn’t know it after the race, but it was their 17th wedding anniversary that day. Pretty cool to be doing a triathlon for your anniversary!

The Swim

Finally, my wave was up. I sauntered into the water and was trying to stay back a little and to the left. The problem was everyone was staying back from the starting line. I was not about to stay back that far, so I ended up moving past everyone to the start line which was about waist deep. Not exactly where I like to be, but if they are going to lag back I might as well take the head start.

French Creek Olympic Triathlon 2016-Swim Exit
French Creek Olympic Triathlon 2016-Swim Exit


The first 200 yards kind of sucked like it usually does. It is just full of anxiety and nervous energy that it makes it hard to breathe. There was a little bit of bumping since some of the faster guys were going past or over me. Eventually, things settled out and got into my pace.

I had mostly clear water from there on out. Although I could have used some drafting help, not having to deal with others is nice too. I maintained a pretty steady swim and held steady for the rest of the two loop course. I never looked at my Garmin until I actually got out of the water.

I never looked at my Garmin until I actually got out of the water. It ready somewhere around 27 minutes, which is ok for me. I was hoping for faster but whatever. The worst thing is that the timing mats are the entrance/exit to transition, not at the swim exit. And it was at least tenth of a mile run to transition over little rocks. So my swim time ended up being around 28 minutes. I hate that!


The 1st transition went rather smoothly. Ditched the wetsuit and popped on my bike shoes, helmet and off I went. Ba-da-bing…ba-da-boom!


There were practically no flat sections on this entire bike course! You are either going up or going down. Nothing in between.

French Creek Olympic Triathlon Bike Course Elevation Profile
French Creek Olympic Triathlon Bike Course Elevation Profile

The road conditions are mostly good, except for one smaller section on Rt 345 that is in SEVERE need of paving. It also would appear to be a well-shaded course, but hard to tell when it was so overcast. The road was also pretty wet

French Creek Olympic Triathlon 2016-Bike
French Creek Olympic Triathlon 2016-Bike

from the rain the night before.

My goal on this leg was to not overcook my legs on the hills and save something for the run. I would also try to bomb the downhills as much as possible and use “gravity” to my advantage.

I feel I executed that plan fairly well. It was surely not the fastest of rides, but my legs were still pretty fresh at the end. I ate one and a half Amrita Bars and 2 bottles of Skratch Labs during the ride. It is pretty easy to eat when you are climbing hills all morning.


T2 was a bit of a blunder. I left my running shoes tied in a double know…duh!! So I was there fumbling around with that for far too long. It was such a rookie mistake. I also put socks on, which cost me some more time. Despite that, I still got out in 2 minutes and looking at the results probably would not have made much difference in the end anyway.


The run started out flat for about a 1/4 mile and then it was up…and up…and up…for the first 4 miles. As soon as my legs were getting accustomed to running, the hills started. There was one section along a small lake that flattened out for a little bit, but then it was up again. The Olympic course also took a left, when the Sprint athletes went right back to the finish, to enjoy another larger hill climb.  By the time I reached the top my legs were screaming. I even walked about 10 yards or so just to get my HR down a little bit.

French Creek Olympic Triathlon Run Course Elevation Profile
French Creek Olympic Triathlon Run Course Elevation Profile


French Creek Tri Run
French Creek Tri Run

After the 2nd turnaround at the top of the last hill, it was all downhill for 2 miles to the finish. Ihave to say that last two miles were actually pretty fun. You knew you could just coast it in at that point. I felt bad for all the other athletes who were coming up those hills and was trying to give them some encouragement as I cruised past them.


I crossed the finish line feeling pretty good. The last 2 miles actually refreshed me a bit. Finish time was 3:01 and a few seconds. Not the best time for a Olympic distance event, but this was not your ordinary Olympic distance race.

French Creek Tri Finish
French Creek Tri Finish


After the race, I met up Amy & Bill, My Amrita-buddy Todd, and also Terry & Sean Fenoff who I had met at my a strength training workshop that my strength coach had a couple years ago.

I stopped by the timing booth and looked at the posted race results.  I saw that I came in 4th in my age group, which left me a little disappointed that I missed the podium by one place! Ugh…so close!

I decided that it wasn’t worth sticking around at that point and started packing up my bike and things in transition. I was also texting my wife telling her I got 4th in AG. While I was doing that Bill had stopped by and congratulated me on getting 3rd Place in my AG???!!! What??!! He informed me that the 1st place guy in my age group won the overall 1st place for the race, so that got me into 3rd! SWEET!!

I immediately text my wife back and said “scratch that…I actually got 3rd!” She was a little bummed that she wasn’t there now. So back I went and hung out for the post-race awards. It was pretty cool since Bill & Amy both won their Age Groups and they announced that it was their 17th wedding anniversary too! Also, Terry, Sean and Todd all podiumed too.  So it was pretty cool to see everyone up there.

French Creek Tri Podium
French Creek Tri Podium

I was pretty happy to finally get a podium finish in triathlon. I have been doing this for over 8 years and have yet to get a podium in a triathlon. I got one for running races and duathlons, but never a triathlon. I think the build up of experience over the years with good coaches and my focus on strength training this year is making a difference.

Next up Ironman 70.3 Syracuse…

Thanks for reading!

Race Report: St. Luke’s Half Marathon 2016-Older, Fatter, and Faster?

Last season I had to bail out on the St. Luke’s Half Marathon on the morning of due to a nasty stomach bug. I was looking forward to putting that behind me and getting another result here under my belt.

To make things a little more interesting, I also challenged a friend from work, who we’ll call “Stéphane” to protect his anonymity,  to this race. Stéphane is a much younger, lighter and naturally faster runner than I am, but I hoped that the longer distance may help level the playing field a bit. Also, the added competition may help motivate me to a new personal best time.

This race had given me my current standing half marathon PR back in 2010 with a time of 1:46:47 at a 8:06min/mi pace. I was also about 20 lbs lighter(165lbs) and 6 years younger(41) back then. Could I really beat this 6-year-old PR carrying another 20lbs and being over a half a decade older? I felt like I could, but who knows.

St. Luke's Half Marathon 2010 crop me bloody nipples
St. Luke’s Half Marathon 2010

The weather turned out to be perfect running weather. Sunny, clear and in the mid-50’s. I made it to the starting line without issue and with plenty of time. Stéphane and I chatted a bit as the 5k-ers took off. We were lined up pretty close to the front, so not to get caught up in the herd. I had got caught up in this the first time I did this race and suffered 2 of my slowest miles until I got past this group.

The gun went off and we were on our way. Stéphane was off and quickly out of site into the leading pack. I stayed back and tried to settle into a somewhat comfortable pace without getting caught up in the start of the race over-eagerness. I looked down at my Garmin and saw my pace was in the low 7 min/mi. Whoa…nelly!

My first mile was a 7:15 which is more like my 5k pace. I toned it down a bit and settled into around 7:30min/mi pace. While this seemed a bit fast for me, it was feeling right. I pretty much maintained this pace for the first half of the race, which runs along Martin Luther King Blvd and is mostly flat.

Heading out Martin Luther King Blvd – photo courtesy of MyEPEvents

As I approached the first turnaround near South 4th St., I saw my coach, Todd Wiley, flying by very close to the leaders of the race. He would end up finishing 6th overall!

I soon saw Stéphane, heading back as I went by the Parkettes Gymnastics gym. He was about a quarter mile ahead of me, but still not out of reach if he had issues later on. But could I keep up this pace and catch him.

I hit the 10k split timer just past the 15th street bridge which read 46:57! This would be a 10k PR time for me??? WTH?!

I made the left turn over the steep little bridge into the Lehigh Parkway. As I hit the gravel path things started to slow down a bit. Was the loose gravel stealing my energy or was it the steep  incline of the bridge and the little hill that followed taking the wind out of my sails? My legs were starting to rebel a bit.

As I reached the next two steep hills before the red covered bridge turnaround my pace was slowing to a 8:30 min/mi pace. I could feel the fatigue really starting to hurt now. I was starting to question whether I could sustain the personal best time I had started with.

I tried to hit most every water stop and get at least a mouthful of water in at each without stopping. I know that I don’t need much hydration a race of this duration. Getting a swig every 15 mins or so is good for me. I stuffed down an Amrita Bar right before the start and had another one broken up into pieces in my Spibelt if I needed more. The problem is getting the bar out of the Spibelt seemed like it would take more time to get out than it would be worth, so I pressed on.

In the Lehigh Parkway – Photo courtesy of myEPEvents

After a couple slower miles in the parkway, I was able to pick things up a little during the 11th mile. Miles 12 and 13 were a little slow again as my legs were really hurting. I knew there was no catching up with Stéphane unless he was having a really bad day. The thought that that may be a possibility kept me pushing on.

I finally made the last turn down along Cedar Beach and up into J. Birney Crum Stadium. I was so glad to be almost done. My Garmin was reading 1:44 and some change so I was pretty sure I had a new PR, but not sure where my speed co-worker was.

As I crossed the line, I grabbed my medal and saw Stéphane standing there already finished. Ahhh! I got so caught up in trying to catch him that my PR seemed to be of no significance to me. I was also a bit disappointed that I slowed as the race went on. A sign that I probably went out too fast.

The Finish – photo courtesy of myEpEvents

Ok, I just PR’d my Half-Marathon time by over 2 freakin’ minutes??!!! What the hell is wrong with me? It wasn’t until a little later when I met up with my coach who asked how I did. My initial reaction was that of disappointment but then followed up with I PR’d by over two minutes. He was like what? He was then like “that’s awesome!” I thought huh, yeah what am I disappointed about? I guess sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees.

Last week I was talking about it with my strength coach, Fernando, and explaining how I was able to PR that race being 6 years older and 20 lbs heavier. Fernando said you are “older and faster” and I added “and fatter too”. Hence the title Older, Fatter, and Faster! Pretty funny.

I have actually dropped about 15 lbs so far since the beginning of this season and am on track to lose at least another 15 by Ironman Mont-Tremblant in August. Getting down another 15 lbs will only serve to make me that much faster. I have PR’d both races I have done this season, so I am off to a good start and the sky is the limit here.

Next up is the French Creek Olympic Distance Triathlon in late May. This will be a good indicator of where my triathlon fitness lies by putting together all the disciplines. I am anticipating some improvement in the swim with some of the changes in technique I have made that have improved my times in the pool. Running off the bike will be interesting to see if I can sustain my improved pace with some bike legs. 2016 is proving to be off to a good start to a hopeful season.